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Can Lotuses Bloom in a Sea of Flames? Buddhism & Modern Conflict. LECTURE by Prof. Paul Harrison

Despite its serene public image, Buddhism, like other religious traditions, can be both a force for peace and a source of conflict. Three case studies from Asia explore this dual capacity. The first looks at the role of Buddhism in the protracted and bitter ethnic violence which tore Sri Lanka apart for many years. The second considers recent events in Burma/Myanmar, and the part Buddhism has played both in the struggle for democracy and in the increasingly violent ethnic conflict there. The third examines the role of religion in the long struggle for self-determination and freedom in Tibet. The lecture will also touch briefly on the role of Buddhism in other parts of Asia during the modern period.
Educated in his native New Zealand and in Australia, Paul Harrison specializes in Buddhist literature and history, especially that of the Mahāyāna, and in the study of Buddhist manuscripts in Sanskrit, Chinese and Tibetan. He is the author of The Samādhi of Direct Encounter with the Buddhas of the Present, and of numerous journal articles on Buddhist sacred texts and their interpretation.

Details

When:

Tuesday, February 23, 2016. 07:30 PM

Where:

260-113 (Pigott Hall)

Sponsor:

Department of Religious Studies

Contact:

723-3322
lionda@stanford.edu

Admission:

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC