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CLAS Lecture Series: The Continuing Process of Crop Domestication: Consequences for Genetic Conservation and Climate Change Mitigation

CLAS Lecture Series Presents:
The Continuing Process of Crop Domestication: Consequences for Genetic Conservation and Climate Change Mitigation
Paul Gepts, Distinguished Professor, Dept. of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis
Crop domestication is generally a selection process for adaptation to selection by farmers and consumers. It was one of the key elements of the Neolithic Revolution(s), which took place some 10,000 years ago and led to the advent of civilizations on different continents. Three groups of factors drive domestication and subsequent evolutionary steps among crops: intrinsic biological processes, environmental factors, and - unique to crop evolution - human socio-economic and cultural factors. Crop evolution continues to shape genetic diversity today and is a key to adaptation of crops to global climate change.
Dr. Gepts' main academic interest lies in the study of crop evolution and its applications to genetic diversity conservation and breeding. He has focused primarily on Phaseolus-Vigna beans given their importance in California crop rotations and internationally. This has provided his research program with the continuity and opportunity to conduct in depth studies on these crops. However, as opportunities arose, he has also conducted research on other plants of Mesoamerican origin, such as teosinte (wild ancestor of maize) and chili pepper.
 

Details

When:

Friday, February 19, 2016. 12:30 PM

Where:

Bolivar House, 582 Alvarado Row

Sponsor:

Center for Latin American Studies

Contact:

(650) 725-0383
latinamerica@stanford.edu

Admission:

Lunch Provided | No RSVP Necessary
Bolivar House, 582 Alvarado Row