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Energy Seminar: John Deutch, emeritus institute professor, MIT, What are the Prospects for Significant Global Deployment of Nuclear Power?

Talk Abstract:The construction of new nuclear plants in the U.S. and OECD countries has slowed substantially due to the low cost of natural gas, incentives for deployment of wind and solar, and especially due to the high cost of nuclear power plant construction and safety concerns after Fukushima. The fleet is aging and significant retirements are expected beginning in 2030. While construction of new plants continues in a few countries notably, China, South Korea, and Russia it seems likely that nuclear will experience a decline in its share of world wide electricity generation. Nuclear power is an important source of carbon free electricity. The purpose of this talk is to assess the prospect for future nuclear power deployment at significant scale. What are possibly technologies? What are expected development schedules and costs? Who will pay for the development and initial deployment? What should governments do? Are there prospects for international collaboration?
Brief Bio:John Deutch is an emeritus Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Mr. Deutch has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1970, and has served as Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, Dean of Science and Provost. Mr. Deutch has published over 140 technical publications in physical chemistry, as well as numerous publications on technology, energy, international security, and public policy issues. Previously Mr. Deutch was the Director of Central Intelligence, before that he served as the Deputy Secretary of Defense, and before that he served as Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisitions and Technology. John Deutch also served in a number of positions for the U.S. Department of Energy: as Director of Energy Research, Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Technology, and Undersecretary of the Department.

Details

When:

Monday, January 11, 2016. 04:30 PM

Where:

NVIDIA auditorium, Huang Engineering

Sponsor:

Precourt Institute for Energy
swang24@stanford.edu

Admission:

Free and open to all