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The Mediated Construction of Reality: from Berger and Luckmann to Norbert Elias

In this talk Nick Couldry will outline the project of his about-to-be-published completed book, The Mediated Construction of Reality (Polity October 2016, co-written with Andreas Hepp). The book offers a critical reevaluation and rearticulation of the social constructivist ambitions of Berger and Luckmann’s 1966 book The Social Construction of Reality while radically rethinking the implications of this for a work saturated not just with digital media, but with data processes. The talk will outline how a materialist phenomenology can draw not just on traditional phenomenology, but on the social theory of Norbert Elias, particularly his concept of figurations, to address the challenges of social analysis in the face of datafication. Elias, he will argue is a particularly important theorist on whom to draw in making social constructivism ready to face the deep embedding of the social world with digital technologies, and more than that, to outline the challenges for social order of such a world. More broadly, he will argue for a reengagement of media theory with the broader tradition of social theory in the face of a radical expansion of what media are, and how mediation is embedded in everyday social orders.   
Nick Couldry is a sociologist of media and culture. He is Professor of Media Communications and Social Theory, and Head of the Department of Media and Communications, at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is the author or editor of twelve books including most recently The Mediated Construction of Reality (with Andreas Hepp, Polity, 2016), Ethics of Media (2013 Palgrave, coedited with Mirca Madianou and Amit Pinchevski), Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice (Polity 2012) and Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics After Neoliberalism (Sage 2010).

Details

When:

Monday, February 13, 2017. 12:00 PM

Where:

McClatchy Hall Room 101B

Sponsor:

Department of Communication

Contact:

725-1941
mdezutti@stanford.edu

Admission:

Free and Open to the Public