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Megan Daniels (PhD Candidate): "The Queen of Heaven and a Goddess for All the People: Kingship, Religion, and Cultural Evolution between Greece and the Near East, 3000 to 500 BCE"

The Department of Classics at Stanford University invites you to attend a public dissertation defense by Megan Daniels on her dissertation entitled: "The Queen of Heaven and a Goddess for All the People: Kingship, Religion, and Cultural Evolution between Greece and the Near East, 3000 to 500 BCE".
This dissertation traces the evolution of the ideologies of divinely-sanctioned kingship within the cultural groups of western Asia and the eastern Mediterranean through textual and material sources concerning the worship of the Queen of Heaven. Daniels argues that the Iron Age Greeks, even as they experimented with novel egalitarian forms of rule, engaged with and transformed discourses of divine kingship through mythical and ritual practice, and, in the process, transformed the meaning of humans’ relationships with the gods. The major aim of this study is to develop a comprehensive historical perspective on Greece and its cultural, social, and political relations with cultural groups to the east through the shared ritual language surrounding divine kingship. To this end, along with case studies, she considers theories of cultural evolution of religion, and in particular religion’s role in the cultural and cognitive shifts that heralded the axial age, to understand the trajectories and meanings of these shifting relationships, between Greece and the Near East, king and society, and humans and their gods.

Details

When:

Thursday, June 2, 2016. 02:00 PM

Where:

Bldg. 110, Rm. 112

Sponsor:

Department of Classics

Contact:

650-723-0479
classics@stanford.edu

Admission:

Free and open to the public.