You are here

Faculty in the News Archive:

March, 2015

March 27, 2015

"On the Nature of Things," the new dance work by choreographer Karole Armitage, features text by Stanford professor of biology and population studies Paul R. Ehrlich.

March 26, 2015

This feature story on Stanford d.school's use of design thinking mentions President John L. Hennessy as well as Michael Shanks, classics professor and Harry J. Elam Jr., vice provost for undergraduate education and professor of drama. 

March 26, 2015

James Campbell, professor of history; James Ferguson, professor of anthropology; and Ken Opalo, doctoral student in political science, are co-signers of an open letter that accuses American broadcaster "60 Minutes" of rendering Africans "voiceless and all but invisible" in its portrayal of the continent.

March 25, 2015

The upcoming performance at Bing Concert Hall of "The Demo," is a musical retelling of Engelbart's landmark demonstration of interactive computing.  Engelbart was a former researcher at the Stanford Research Institute.

March 24, 2015

Release.Restart.Review, a new literary arts anthology by and for Stanford students, includes poems, visual art, and both non-fiction and fiction pieces that address issues related to emotional well-being.

March 23, 2015

Stanford's archives on the attack of the luxury liner, the Lusitania, inspired author Erik Larson's new book, Dead Wake.

March 23, 2015

Stanford emeritus professor of philosophy John Perry explains how being a perfectionist can actually get in the way of getting things done. 

March 4, 2015

Tobias Wolff, acclaimed author and Stanford professor of English and Creative Writing, discusses performances of his stories by San Francisco theater company Word for Word in a Newsweek article on the performance group's new dramatizations of works by Alice Munro.

March 2, 2015

In a recent appearance on KQED's Forum with Michael Krasny, renowned writer and Stanford visiting author Joyce Carol Oates talks about her latest novel, The Sacrifice, and "engages readers in a contemporary dialogue about race, sexual abuse, and the nature of truth."