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Faculty in the News Archive:

November, 2015

November 29, 2015

Jindong Cai, associate professor (performance) in the Center for East Asian Studies, talks about how composer Ludwig van Beethoven's story matched Chinese ideals of perseverance and fit into Chinese culture.

November 26, 2015

Robert D. Crews, associate professor of history, points out how recent protests in Afghanistan signal a dramatic shift in Afghan politics.

November 17, 2015

Stanford professor, philosopher, and one-time welder Ken Taylor responds via NPR to Marco Rubio's characterization of philosophy, saying that the study of abstract thought serves us well regardless of our vocation.

November 13, 2015

Amy Freed's comedy, “Monster Builder” digs into the brain of a mega-architect whose postmodern steel and glass structures are a thinly veiled attempt at achieving world domination. 

November 11, 2015

The archaeology exhibition "From 'Curios' to Ambassadors: Changing Roles of the Daggett Collection from Tribes of the Lower Klamath River" is featured in the Del Norte Triplicate.

November 11, 2015

India’s Economic Times features an obituary of Stanford professor and eminent French intellectual René Girard.

November 10, 2015

Stanford librarian who has helped grow the university’s Baltic Studies program receives an Estonian e-resident digital identity card.

November 10, 2015

René Girard was a professor emeritus of French and Italian.  Robert Harrison, also a professor of French and Italian, talks about Girard's religious stance in the obituary.

November 10, 2015

Clayborne Carson, professor of history and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute, spoke about how the pivotal roles young people and women played in the Civil Rights movement, and how they could again. 

November 5, 2015

Undergraduate Sarah Sadlier, a Stanford Humanities Center Hume Humanities Honors Fellow and the research assistant for the exhibition “Red Horse Pictographic Account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn,” is mentioned in the Los Angeles Times. (May require a subscription to view the full story.)

November 3, 2015

Analyzing Ben Franklin's letters, Stanford Humanities Center and historian Caroline Winterer tells NPR that he would have been an avid user of social media.