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Interdisciplinary Framework for the Anastylosis of an Ancient Roman Temple

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 11, 2018. 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
Meeting Location: 
Building 110, Room 112
Workshop: 
Data Scarcity of the Earth and Human Past
Meeting Description: 

For the past 12 years, Dr. Erdogmus has been the engineering director of a large excavation on the Southern Coast of Turkey. The ancient Roman site Antioch ad Cragum includes the remains of a significant imperial Temple, which was completely in ruins in 2005. The date and the cause of the collapse is unknown, even by the locals, therefore it is estimated to be centuries ago. One of the goals of the larger project is to re-erect this temple partially and with as much authentic materials as possible. This process, called anastylosis, is challenging due to the imbalance of what is known and unknown about the structure, the interaction of many disciplines (archeology, engineering, conservation, construction, etc…), as well as the poor condition of the authentic materials. There are general guidelines for anastylosis provided by the Venice I Charter and similar documents, but these guidelines are not detailed for specific situations, and they essentially give the responsibility  of designing an ethical solution to the team responsible of each project.

Dr. Erdogmus has been working with a team of classicists and archeologists on this project since the start of the program, which makes this team unique compared to others, where engineers typically join later. Therefore, a part of this talk will cover challenges and opportunities that the team faces at the boundary of these disciplines. After that, the discussion will focus mostly on the engineering techniques utilized for this project, from on-site assessment techniques to material experimentations in the lab and modeling efforts to reverse-engineer the unknown history of this Temple. Finally, an idealized conceptual framework that comprise the future work on the Temple, which was recently awarded an NSF grant, will be presented.

Ece Erdogmus, PhD, PE is a professor and program head for the Architectural Engineering Program at the Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Erdogmus’ main research expertise relates to the assessment and rehabilitation of historical masonry structures and she has authored over 60 peer-reviewed technical articles on related topics. She is the engineering director of a large excavation on the Southern Coast of Turkey: The ancient Roman site Antioch ad Cragum, near modern day Gazipasa, Antalya.

She typically teaches masonry and timber design, engineering statics, history of architectural engineering and architecture, and engineering study abroad in Italy focusing on historic masonry. She has won several teaching awards. Recently, she was selected as one of the 2018 Rising Stars for the Civil + Structural Engineer Magazine. She serves on the TMS 402/602 Masonry Code committee and Existing Masonry Committee. She is also an active member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Architectural Engineering Institute. She is the Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Architectural Engineering and a past associate editor for the Masonry Society Journal. Aside from her numerous technical publications and talks related to her research work, she has also been an invited speaker at various national Professors’ Workshops with respect to incorporating masonry into engineering curricula. She is fluent in Turkish, English, and near-fluent in Italian.

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