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Maritime Settlement Patterns and Seafaring in Prehistoric China

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 5, 2015. 05:00 PM - 06:30 PM
Meeting Location: 
Building 500, Room 106
Workshop: 
Archaeological Histories and Futures
Meeting Description: 
About the speaker:
Dr. Tianlong Jiao is the Curator of Chinese Art at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and an adjunct chair professor at Xiamen University.  He received his Ph. D in Anthropology from Harvard University. His specialty is Chinese archaeology and museum studies. He has conducted archaeological projects in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Hawaii and Central America. He also curated many museum exhibitions. His publications have explored a variety of issues including the origin of maritime adaptation and seafaring, maritime trade, early food production, formation of states, ancient environment, archaeology of gender and style.  He has authored/co-authored six books and more than seventy research papers both in Chinese and in English. His English book The Neolithic of Southeast China (Cambria Press 2007) was the winner of the 2007 Philip and Eugenia Cho Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Asian Studies.
 
Meeting description:
The changes of prehistoric maritime settlement patterns have great implications for understanding the social, economic and cultural transformations along the vast coastal area of China. The development of long distance seafaring by some coastal societies had greatly changed the interaction sphere in prehistoric China, leading to a much wide exchange network, and in some instances enabling a large scale population dispersals.  What are the characteristics of maritime settlements in prehistoric China? When did long distance seafaring started? What are the regional variations and chronological changes of the prehistoric maritime settlements?  In terms of the field techniques, how different is the maritime settlement archaeology in comparison with inland archaeology? Over the past decade, the author and collaborators conducted a series of settlement archaeological investigation in coastal China, and the discoveries have shed much new lights on these issues.

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