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Pulp Science Fiction's Legacy to Women in Science

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 3, 2016. 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
Meeting Location: 
CCSRE Conference Room (Building 360)
Workshop: 
Interdisciplinary Working Group in Critical Theory
Meeting Description: 

This year, the Working Group in Critical Theory has joined forces with Infinite Possibilities: The Working Group on Speculative Fiction, to present a yearlong series on The Speculative. This session will feature the work of Elizabeth Garbee, which examines a “pulp” science fiction corpus (1930 – 1965) through corpus linguistic analysis in order to digitally reconstruct the gendered occupational identities created by those authors, and the culture they represent, which perpetuated a stereotype of “the scientist” and how they characterized women in professional scientific roles.

Elizabeth Garbee earned her B.A. from Oberlin College in Astrophysics and Classical Greek Literature. During her undergraduate years, she studied gravitational wave astronomy and spinning black hole binary systems. She joined the Risk Innovation Lab as a Research Assistant in August 2015, and also as a PhD student in the Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology program at Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes in 2014. Her current graduate research interests include domestic science policy, informal science education, and the value of a STEM PhD.

Her respondent, Mark Algee-Hewitt is Assistant Professor of English at Stanford and the co-associate research director of the Stanford Literary Lab. His research focuses on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in England and Germany and seeks to combine literary criticism with digital and quantitative analyses of literary texts.

Please contact cawkward@stanford.edu to RSVP

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