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Stanford Reads Comics: Student Symposium on New Comics Research

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 21, 2015. 04:30 PM - 06:30 PM
Meeting Location: 
Board Room, Humanities Center
Workshop: 
Graphic Narrative Project
Meeting Description: 
Meeting description:
The Perceptron in Comic Narratives: Discussing Marbles and Asterios Polyp
Anthony Mainero
 
In this discussion, we will apply modern scientific developments in understanding the statistical processes that underlie neurological processes in the human brain, such as memory reconstruction, to how comic artists Ellen Forney and David Mazzucchelli construct impossibly-distorted, evocative visual narratives in their graphic novels.
 
Anthony Mainero is a Master's student at Stanford studying Computer Science, with emphasis in statistical computation for AI applications. He finished his undergraduate studies in Computer Science and Creative Writing this past June, and has a strong interest in the engineering principles of storytelling.
 
The Scientific Method of Richard McGuire's Here
Sarah Naftalis
 
Is the vantage of the scientist incompatible with that of the artist? This paper imagines the narrow, domestic corner chronicled in Richard McGuire's 1989 comic Here as a laboratory, a graphic space that enlists scientific principles to open up, rather than inhibit, creative possibilities.
 
Sarah Naftalis is a second year PhD student in the Department of Art and Art History. Her focus is American art, film, and popular culture of the mid-twentieth century.
 
And These Are The Good Guys!: Temporal Aesthetics in Howard Chaykin's American Flagg
Max Suechting
 
As the rise of cable news in the 1980s wrought major changes on the American media landscape, pop culture of this period frequently imagined dark, strange worlds in which reality itself seemed to be at stake. In short, even as televised "reality" became omnipresent, a certain wing of Western pop culture began to explore a gnawing un-reality. I explore the relationship of mass media and this "unreality" as thematized by Howard Chaykin's hyper-reflexive science-fiction/adventure comic American Flagg. In addition to contextualizing Flagg via references to popular music, film and literature, I examine the experience of simultaneous time encoded at the level of page layout and design sensibility, and how it reflects back on the broader media environment.
 
Max studies the relationship between culture and technology in post-War Afro-diasporic music, art, and literature. He is particularly interested in electronic music and its relationship to the multimedia aesthetic of Afro-futurism, including electric jazz of the 1960s-70s, Detroit and Chicago house, footwork, and various online electronic music culture. Other areas of interest include Caribbean and postcolonial theory, literature criticism, jazz studies, and film/media studies.
 
Mind, Body, World: The Shifting Perceptual Regimes of American Comics
Laura Zalles
 
The comic reader's experience is heavily influenced by the interactions between bodies and space on the page. These interactions create perceptual realms for the reader to occupy, which vary from the bodily and physical to the transcendental and sublime. We observe this range of perceptual realities when examining the breath of American comics over the past 100 years. 
 
Laura Zalles is a junior majoring in Geology, but when she isn't thinking about rocks, she's usually thinking about comics.

Workshops Calendar

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