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Current Workshops

Archaeology: Connectivity and Temporality, An Archaeological View

This interdisciplinary workshop explores the theme of connectivity and temporality in the archaeologicalrecord. How do our modern conceptions of what it means to be connected influence our material culture research? How do differential understandings of time transform perceptions of reality? This workshop allows scholars from a diverse array of departments to work through the epistemological underpinnings of their approach to the archaeological record.  

Coodinators

Faculty:

Ian Hodder

Graduate Student:

Sarah Toby Wilker
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Cognition and Language Workshop

The Cognition and Language Workshop creates a thriving community of language researchers by bringing a cognitive perspective to the exchange of new ideas about language. This year, the workshop focuses on the role of prediction in language processing and use. Some of the workshop’s questions include: To what extent do language users predict upcoming linguistic or extra-linguistic information? At what levels of linguistic representation does prediction occur? How do predictions change in response to novel input and learning?

Coodinators

Faculty:

Judith Degen, Dan Lassiter

Graduate Student:

Brandon Waldon
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Blokker Research Workshop

Cold War In Asia: Culture, Technology, History

Contemporary East Asia has been shaped by the Cold War. The conflict left its mark on public discourse, popular culture, scientific and technological development, and social and political structures. Still, the manifestations, developments, and impact of the Cold War in East Asia on global culture have received little attention. Of late, scholars have been revising our understanding of the Cold War from that of superpower rivalries to diverse global and cultural phenomena with multiple actors of conflicting interests. This workshop explores the diversity and richness of the Cold War by reviewing new research agendas, methodological issues, archival sources, and diverse disciplinary approaches.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Yumi Moon, Dafna Zur

Graduate Student:

Claudius Kim
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

Concerning Violence: A Decolonial Collaborative Research Group

Concerning Violence: A Decolonial Collaborative Research Group challenges the political and economic, ontological, and epistemic violence of coloniality with the goal of rethinking the premises of cultural and literary scholarship towards the practice of transformational knowledge production. The concept of coloniality refers to the logics that empowered modern colonialism and that persist today through material and ideological legacies of violence. These legacies of violence remain integral to our current understandings of culture and literature. Decoloniality, as a mode of thinking, praxis, and sociality, has provided a new generation of intellectuals and activists the tools to uncover the logics that link global political and economic regimes of domination; systems of oppression that target minoritized peoples; and structures privileging Eurocentric knowledge production. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Angela Garcia, José David Saldívar

Graduate Student:

Cynthia Garcia
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Humanities Center Fellows Research Workshop

Critical Orientations to Race and Ethnicity

“Race” and “ethnicity” are terms used so commonly throughout American society that their meaning—even among scholars—is often taken for granted. This interdisciplinary workshop interrogates how different academic fields approach these concepts and re-examine the key questions that animate research on race and ethnicity.  Through exposure to the latest scholarship and debates in the humanities, social sciences, and interdisciplinary work, this workshop challenges participants to hone analytical approaches to race and ethnicity in their own work. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Ana Raquel Minian

Graduate Student:

David Song
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Digital Aesthetics: Critical Approaches to Computational Culture

From IBM punch cards to digital census forms, from ASCII art to Oculus Rift, how do we think and feel on screens and online, on disk or in the cloud, at the keyboard or off-the-grid? How do digital objects and code blur boundaries between text, image, and performativeacts? How do they challenge our understanding of the distinctions between a medium and its content? This workshop hosts conversations about material culture studies, performance theory, technology history, and aesthetics to explore a partnershipbetween engineering and the humanities by bringing technological objects into critical humanities research and introducing new vocabularies into discussions of the design and production of our digital future.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Shane Denson

Graduate Student:

Douglas Eacho
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

Research Workshop in Honor of John Bender

Environmental Humanities Project

Cultural, philosophical, and aesthetic dimensions form a crucial part of the search for solutions to urgent environmental problems. This workshop explores the recent work of humanities scholars, including writers and artists, who engage with environmental problems in disciplines such as cultural studies, history, literary studies, philosophy and anthropology, as well as the social and natural sciences. The workshop goal is twofold: First, to show the importance of environmentally-oriented perspectives for transforming basic assumptions in humanistic research, and second, to emphasize how humanistic approaches reshape inquiry about environmental issues in other disciplines.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Gavin Jones

Graduate Student:

Vicky Googasian
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

Marta Sutton Weeks Research Workshop

Ethics and Politics, Ancient and Modern

The Ethics and Politics, Ancient and Modern (EPAM) workshop explores topics with broad interdisciplinary appeal, especially in the areas of classics, philosophy, and political theory. The workshop examines possibilities for reuniting classical and classically-influenced ideas about ethics with political theorizing that is applicable to the modern world. With a focus on classical moral and political philosophy, this workshop creates a common ground for an interdisciplinary discussion among graduate students and faculty.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Chris Bobonich, Josiah Ober

Graduate Student:

Jonathan Matthew Amaral
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Eurasian Empires

Eurasian Empires explores the connected and comparative history of early empires from the Mediterranean to China, defining time and space broadly. We focus on themes and problems common to the many empires that asserted control from ancient Greek and Middle Eastern empires to early modern Russian, Ottoman, Safavid/Qajar, Uzbek, Mughal and the Chinese empires from Han to Qing. This year’s thematic focus is Empire, Nature, and Crisis. Workshop questions include:What was the relationship between the imperial organizations of the Medieval and Early-Modern Empires of Asia and Europe and their physical environments? How did environment of the empires shape their social, political, and economic structures? How did merchant, scholar, and spiritual networks operate within and beyond the empires? How was crisis—political, social, institutional, and spiritual—perceived and negotiated by different groups?

Coodinators

Faculty:

Nancy Kollman, Ali Yaycioglu

Graduate Student:

Morgan Tufan
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

Feminist/Queer Colloquium

This year’s workshop focuses on the prefix trans in the myriad ways it is used—transgender, transgression, transition, transnational, transsexual, transvestite, transman, and transwoman, among others—with a primary focus on questions of crossing and the binary. How does the study of trans fit within but also point to the blind spots in current feminist and queer history and theory? What do queer and feminist studies have to learn from the trans history and theory currently being written, and are there ways in which queer and feminist methodology and practice can help this growing field? This workshop brings influential queer, feminist, and trans scholars to Stanford and challenges participants to clarify their academic positions as well as to rethink how our politics are practiced in the contemporary academy and in the world at large.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Adrian Daub

Graduate Student:

Alexis Bard Johnson
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Marta Sutton Weeks Research Workshop

History of Political Thought

The History of Political Thought workshop takes an expansive and global view of political thought, including such common concepts as constitutions and political order, rights provisions, suffrage, theories of representation, legislation, legitimate resistance, the role of religion in politics, and the dissolution of government. Instead of a focus on contemporary normative and ethical questions, the historical study of political thought considers ideas and beliefs that are typically no longer current, and sometimes brackets their normative value. This approach has more in common with intellectual history than with political philosophy. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Jonathan Gienapp, Alison McQueen

Graduate Student:

Jackie Basu
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Linda Randall Meier Research Workshop

Intersections of Documentary Filmmaking, Race, and Engagement

Documentary film is multivalent: a work of art, a tool for advocacy, a text for criticism, a community’s story; a documentary is simultaneously many things to many people. This workshop is a screening and discussion series designed to bring filmmakers, academics, communities and advocates in conversation around many of the issues involved in making and showing documentary films. How do filmmakers cross boundaries of race, community, and identity to create work that is productive and engaging to wide audiences and advocates? What are the ethics of representing a community’s story? What is the boundary between art and advocacy in these contexts? This workshop seeks to artfully pose and explore these questions in a way that enriches the practice and research of a wide variety of disciplines.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Srdan Keca, Jamie Meltzer

Graduate Student:

Dinesh Das Sabu
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Claire and John Radway Research Workshop

Renaissance Worldmaking

What is a world? Even today, the question invites conflicting responses from scientific, political, literary, philosophical, and geographic perspectives. How we choose to answer it reveals much about our own self-understanding and sense of place in the world. This workshop situates the Renaissance as a transatlantic, transnational experiment in generating worldmaking concepts—the globe, the world, the human, empire—viewing it as an “early modernity” that is foundational for our present and yet more experimental, less systematic, than the Enlightenment legacy through which modernity is often understood. As such, it is a crucial site not only for understanding and critiquing modernity but also for imagining alternative conceptions of the world. This workshop also explores new definitions of the spatial and temporal boundaries of early modernity, emphasizing the transatlantic and Mediterranean Renaissances alongside the more familiar Florentine and English accounts, while viewing cartography, literature, translation, philosophy, and science as interwoven practices constitutive of Renaissance worldmaking. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Roland Greene

Graduate Student:

Nicholas Fenech
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

Varieties of Agency

We know much about action simply by virtue of constantly engaging in it. We act so as to affect changes in ourselves, one another, and the world at large. We also make confident use of reasons for action in deciding, explaining, and assessing actions. Yet closer looks at action, agency, and reasons for them show them to be puzzling. In choosing how to act, do we settle things left unsettled by the causal order prior to our choice? When and how can our interactions with others add up to joint action? How is explaining actions in terms of agential reasons related to explaining it in terms of causes? In what way do we know what we’re doing when doing something intentionally? Disciplines across the humanities and sciences have their own ways of tackling these hard questions about agency; this workshop brings them together for focused collaborative investigation.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Barry Maguire

Graduate Student:

Nathan Hauthaler
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Worlds of Work and the Work of Networks

What is work? What kinds of labor can be registered as work? How is a worker made? In considering these questions, this workshop combines two discrete lines of academic inquiry across social sciences—the burgeoning discourses around networks, nodes and connections in contemporary everyday economic life related to embodied and affective forms of precarious labor, and the transdisciplinary scholarship on how work is refracted by social relations of kinship, ethnicity, religion and caste, and lubricated by networks of migration and mobility. This workshop understands proliferation of networks both as an analytical category, an amalgamation of everyday practices, and self-conscious narratives. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Sharika Thiranagama

Graduate Student:

Samil Can
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.