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Current Workshops

Linda Randall Meier Research Workshop

Approaches to Capitalism

Well before the 2008 global economic crisis, historians, anthropologists, and economic sociologists worked to reclaim interpretive authority from those who privileged an abstract “market” or “capital” as the agent of social, cultural, and economic change. These scholars insisted that capitalism has a history that does not unfold uniformly across time and space. Still, the new histories and ethnographies of capitalism remain in a formative stage. This workshop provides clarity to the field by inviting scholars to consider the range of methodological approaches to researching and writing studies of capitalism. Approaches to Capitalism brings together the architects of an emerging subfield to explicate methodological approaches for telling histories and ethnographies of people, space, and resources in the context of capitalism’s development. The goal is to contribute to a larger debate over using capitalism as a synthetic lens to comprehend modern history and anthropology.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Jennifer Burns, Richard White

Graduate Student:

Alastair Su
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Archaeology--Political Landscapes: Past and Present

Operating under the theme of ‘political landscapes,’ this interdisciplinary workshop will explore the intersections of heritage, nationalism, and land use in the past and the present. Drawing on the dual meaning of landscape as both literal landform and figurative locus of activity, this workshop investigates the connections between territory and identity, between past civilizations and modern political formations, and between academic and sociopolitical landscapes. Structured as a weekly colloquium series for faculty and students, the workshop brings together scholars from anthropology, museum studies, art history, geology, and public archaeology to explore not only the material and political facets of landscape but also how our understandings of the past continue to shape the political landscapes of the present. 

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Li Lu, Lynn Meskell

Graduate Student:

Jasmine Reid
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

ARCS: Asian Representations and Constructions of Space

This workshop provides an opportunity for scholars to examine historical and modern Chinese, Himalayan, Indian, and Japanese representations and constructions of real-and-imagined space in the form of paintings, sculptures, maps, and manuscripts depicting a broad scope of spatial territory, ranging from temples and pilgrimage routes, trade and exchange networks, local regions, the wider inhabited world, and the entire cosmos. Drawing on materials ranging from the fifth to twentieth centuries and representing cartographic, religious, and visual cultures, scholars from various departments and disciplines will engage in interdisciplinary conversations with local and visiting speakers, jointly exploring the unifying theme of spatial representation and construction across Asian cultures. Workshop meetings are hosted by the David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford, giving the workshop access to rare maps and cutting edge digital cartographic technologies.

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

John Kieschnick

Graduate Student:

Daniel Tuzzeo
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Cognition and Language Workshop

The Cognition and Language Workshop is a centerpiece of Stanford's thriving community of language researchers, allowing scholars interested in language from a cognitive perspective to meet regularly and exchange ideas. This year’s workshop brings a new focus on language at different timescales. What are the consequences of the fact that language is processed incrementally for how language is understood, produced, learned, and changed? We believe that by dedicating the workshop to issues around time in language use will generate much interest, and will provide a much-needed platform for researchers interested in language at different timescales to exchange ideas and develop new perspectives. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Judith Degen, Dan Lassiter

Graduate Student:

Simon Todd
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Concerning Violence: A Decolonial Collaborative Research Group

The Decolonial Collaborative Research Group (DCRG) challenges the political and economic, ontological, and epistemic violence of coloniality with the goal of rethinking the premises of cultural and literary scholarship towards the practice of transformational knowledge production. The concept of coloniality refers to the logics that empowered European colonialism and that persist today through material and ideological legacies of violence. These legacies of violence remain integral to our current understandings of culture and literature. Because European colonialism was global in scale, ‘coloniality’ is a powerful analytical tool for developing a grounded yet comprehensive theory of globalized modernity. Decoloniality, as a mode of thinking, praxis, and sociality, has provided a new generation of intellectuals and activists the tools to uncover the logics that link global political and economic regimes of domination; systems of oppression that target minoritized peoples; and structures privileging Eurocentric knowledge production.

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Angela Garcia, José David Saldívar

Graduate Student:

Pablo Howard Seward Deleporte
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Humanities Center Fellows Research Workshop

CORE: Critical Orientations to Race and Ethnicity

“Race” and “ethnicity” are terms used so commonly throughout American society that their meaning—even among scholars—is often taken for granted. This interdisciplinary workshop, which grows out of a reading group founded in fall 2016, adopts a critical approach to race and ethnicity in the U.S. This critical approach interrogates how different academic fields approach these concepts, and re-examines the key questions that animate research on race and ethnicity in these disciplines. Workshop meetings will rotate each quarter between the humanities, social sciences, and interdisciplinary work. Through exposure to the latest scholarship and debates across a wide range of fields, this workshop challenges participants to hone their own analytical approaches to race and ethnicity.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Graduate Student:

Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Blokker Research Workshop

Data Scarcity of the Earth and Human Past

This workshop focuses on problems of environmental change that have been indexical to the human condition since ancient times and continue to occupy an increasingly large concern for humans throughout the modern world. Data scarcity exists within research concerning human-environment relationships both throughout the past—where changes in social, political, and economic systems occurred in response to natural earth processes—and also in the modern world, where humans continue to attempt to conceptualize and mitigate the impacts of earth processes on human societies. This workshop merges not only humanistic disciplines but also those in natural earth sciences and engineering. 

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Ian Morris

Graduate Student:

Amanda Gaggioli
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Digital Aesthetics: Critical Approaches to Computational Culture

From IBM punch cards to digital census forms, from ASCII art to Oculus Rift, how do we think and feel on screens and online, on disk or in the cloud, at the keyboard or off-the-grid? How do digital objects and code blur boundaries between text, image, and performative act? How do they trouble our understanding of the distinctions between a medium and its content, and how do new media create new subjects, objects, and worlds? This workshop hosts conversations about digital technology and culture beyond traditional disciplinary lenses, incorporating approaches from material culture studies, performance theory, technology history, aesthetics, and elsewhere. Digital Aesthetics encourages crossing borders between engineering and the humanities, bringing technological objects into critical humanities research, and introducing critical new vocabularies into ongoing discussions of the design and production of our digital present and future.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Shane Denson

Graduate Student:

Jeff Nagy
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Marta Sutton Weeks Research Workshop

Ethics and Politics Ancient and Modern

The Ethics and Politics, Ancient and Modern (EPAM) workshop explores topics with broad interdisciplinary appeal, especially in the areas of classics, philosophy, and political theory. The workshop examines possibilities for reuniting classical and classically-influenced ideas about ethics with political theorizing that is applicable to the modern world. One of the workshop goals is to promote an interdisciplinary discussion among Stanford faculty and students interested in classical moral and political philosophy. This workshop will explore the possibilities for reuniting classical and classically influenced ideas about ethics with political theorizing that is applicable to the modern world.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Chris Bobonich, Josiah Ober

Graduate Student:

Grant Dowling
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Eurasian Empires

Eurasian Empires investigates the connected and comparative history of early empires from the Mediterranean to China, defining space and time broadly. This workshop brings together scholars interested in the general themes and problems common to the many empires that asserted control over this space, from ancient Greek and Middle Eastern empires, to early modern Russian, Ottoman, Safavid/Qajar and Mughal, and Chinese empires from Han to Qing.  Eurasian Empires’ founding theme—The material and political strategies of governance and power in the Eurasian setting—continues to play a significant role in workshop discussions. This year’s workshop delves into new subthemes of economy and religion: the complex interconnections of economy and imperial power; the interaction of religious communities across Eurasian space.

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Nancy Kollman, Ali Yaycioglu

Graduate Student:

Padraic Rohan
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Marta Sutton Weeks Research Workshop

History of Political Thought

This new interdisciplinary workshop brings together scholars across multiple departments who share an interest in the history of political thought. The workshop moves beyond a contemporary focus on normative and ethical questions to consider ideas and beliefs that are typically no longer current, and sometimes brackets their normative value. The workshop’s approach has more in common with intellectual history than with political philosophy. One specific area where we believe these two fields converge is in digital humanities, which can inform and enhance traditional historical text-mining. Rather than working at cross purposes (one being “scientific” and the other “humanistic”), our workshop can help fuse new digital methods with humanistic insights. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Jonathan Gienapp, Alison McQueen

Graduate Student:

Jackie Basu
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Queer Colloquium

Has the Movement failed? It’s not just a question feminists ask themselves; the shock of failure is arguably the affective motif of the 2017-2018 academic year. Thus the Feminist/Queer Colloquium takes on the theme of feminist and queer failure to explore how best to theorize and contend with the limitations of our work—and to discuss what the centrality of failure to queer theory has to offer to us today. Although this yearlong theme is about negativity, workshop discussions will continue to be as forward-thinking, productive, and playful as ever. This workshop brings influential queer and feminist scholars to Stanford as well as hosts working groups that respond to papers in progress. It will challenge participants to clarify their identities as feminist and queer academics and to rethink how our politics are practiced in the contemporary academy and in the world at large.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Adrian Daub

Graduate Student:

Annie Atura
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Research Workshop in Honor of John Bender

The Environmental Humanities Project

The Environmental Humanities Project (EHP) provides a forum for an interdisciplinary approach to environmental issues. The workshop foregrounds recent work of humanities scholars in disciplines such as cultural studies, history, literary studies, philosophy and anthropology that engage environmental problems, and illuminates how this research contributes to discussions about ecological crisis. EHP links scholarship in the humanities with the work of writers and artists, and with research in the social and natural sciences. The workshop goal is twofold: to show the importance of environmentally-oriented perspectives for transforming basic assumptions in humanistic research, and to emphasize how humanistic approaches reshape inquiry about environmental issues in other disciplines. 

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Gavin Jones

Graduate Student:

Vicky Googasian
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Claire and John Radway Research Workshop

Workshop in Poetics

The Workshop in Poetics is a central venue at Stanford and in the Bay Area for sharing projects in a conversation outside of conventional disciplinary and national limits. This workshop explores the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. Oriented toward work in progress by PhD students, the workshop also presents talks by visiting speakers and discussion of both classic and neglected works in the field. The Workshop in Poetics’ agenda is driven by the interests of its members. Within the eclectic critical landscape called “poetics” in literary studies, the workshop offers a forum where scholars with distinctive methods and historical concerns can test their claims and assumptions about poetic objects against the broad linguistic and historical knowledge of the workshop’s members. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Roland Greene, Nicholas Jenkins

Graduate Student:

Melih Levi
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Worlds of Work and the Work of Networks

What is work? What kinds of labor can be registered as work? How is a worker made? In considering these questions, this workshop combines two discrete lines of academic inquiry across social sciences: the burgeoning discourses around networks, nodes and connections in contemporary everyday economic life related to embodied and affective forms of precarious labor; and the transdisciplinary scholarship on how work is refracted by social relations of kinship, ethnicity, religion and caste, and lubricated by networks of migration and mobility. This workshop understands proliferation of networks both as an analytical category, an amalgamation of everyday practices, and self-conscious narratives. 

 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Sharika Thiranagama

Graduate Student:

Nethra Samarawickrema
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.