Search form

Menu

Home of the Human Experience

You are here

Current Workshops

Linda Randall Meier Research Workshop

Approaches to Capitalism

The workshop brings together participants to explore the phenomenon of capitalism, from foundational texts to new methodological approaches. Well before the current global economic crisis, historians and anthropologists explored the “market” or “capital” as agents of social, cultural, and economic change.  In this workshop researchers and advanced students from multiple disciplines come together to test whether capitalism can serve as a lens to understand history and anthropology.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Richard White, Sylvia Yanagisako

Graduate Student:

Destin Jenkins
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Blokker Research Workshop

Archaeologies of Inhabitation and Displacement

This workshop examines how acts of violence and emancipatory projects define past and contemporary societies within colonial and imperial contexts.  It focuses on neglected, subaltern histories and alternative imaginaries, and explores how these are used to negotiate inequalities and dependencies.  It examines migration and diaspora, conflict resolution, as well as histories of marginalized communities, minority groups, and ethnic tension. The workshop hopes to engage scholars of anthropology, political science, history, heritage, archaeology, classics, and regional studies.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Lynn Meskell

Graduate Student:

Sam Holley-Kline
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Research Workshop in Honor of John Bender

Biography: Interrogations, Observations, Studies

This workshop explores why we think biographically. Researchers and advanced students come together to examine biography as a genre and a tradition. Biography and examples of “life-writing” are predominant forms of narrating human history. Participants in this workshop will ask core questions such as: Why have societies produced and preserved such an abundance of “life-writing”?  What is the significance of self-reflexivity in biography? How does biography reflect as well as create history? This workshop will explore such questions theoretically and with a rich array of examples.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Giovanna Ceserani, Michael Shanks

Graduate Student:

Anne Duray
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Cognition and Language

This workshop encourages interdisciplinary insight among the fields of linguistics, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, and computer science to answer questions central to each of these disciplines. Language plays a central role in the coordinated activity that shapes our culture and is crucial to forming abstract thought.  Questions to be considered include: How does language work? How does it interact with the other cognitive processes that shape the human experience?

Coodinators

Faculty:

Daniel Lassiter

Graduate Student:

Simon Todd
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Eurasian Empires

The workshop focuses on themes and problems common to the many empires that controlled lands surrounding ancient Greece and the Middle East, namely the early modern Russian, Ottoman, Safavid/Qajar and Mughal, and Chinese empires from Han to Qing. Topics of interest include the imagination of imperial space and power through visual and literary forms, different modes of imperial knowledge production, as well as material and political strategies of governance and power.  This workshop hopes to appeal to scholars in history, classics, religious studies, anthropology, political science, and literature.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Nancy Kollman, Ali Yaycioglu

Graduate Student:

Ashley Walters
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Humanities Center Fellows Research Workshop

Graphic Narrative Project

From political cartoons and centuries-old Japanese woodblock prints to superhero serials, manga, comics journalism and webcomics, pictures and words have been combined by visionary artists who saw the potential to tell stories in ways not possible through text or image alone. The Graphic Narrative Project explores the many manifestations of this medium, spanning boundaries of race, nation, genre, time period, and language to bring together faculty, students, artists, and scholars from across the disciplines.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Scott Bukatman

Graduate Student:

Mia Lewis
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Claire and John Radway Research Workshop

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Consciousness

Conscious experience is a phenomenon that each of us knows intimately well, yet explaining consciousness has proved to be exquisitely difficult. This workshop explores the nature of conscious experience from a variety of viewpoints that cross boundaries in the humanities and sciences. This year the workshop addresses the “Hard Problem of Consciousness” (aka the problem of qualia), consciousness and literature, zombies in philosophy, and altered states of consciousness and creativity.

Coodinators

Faculty:

John Perry, Paul Skokowski

Graduate Student:

Michaela Hulstyn
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Marta Sutton Weeks Research Workshop

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Contemporary

The workshop examines the “contemporary” with a focus on three defining moments: 1945, 1989, and 2001. These moments all carried global significance, yet also had local consequences that require a comparative approach between national or regional perspectives. The hybrid term “contemporary” serves as a device with which to examine cultural objects and phenomena in politics, culture, and the arts.  In order to share ideas and debates generated in the workshop, and to encourage broad participation within and beyond the Stanford community, this workshop will also offer an open-access online platform for ongoing discussion. 

Coodinators

Faculty:

Amir Eshel

Graduate Student:

Rachel Kirkwood
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Oral Literature and Literate Orality

This workshop explores oral literature as verbal art that is perpetuated by word of mouth. It will gather researchers and advanced students from the humanities, social sciences, and technical sciences who are curious about the place of oral literature in literate societies. In this interdisciplinary community, this workshop seeks to bridge the written/oral divide. Material ranges widely and includes examples from our contemporary experience with centuries-old nursery rhymes and what has been termed “the secondary orality” of the Internet age.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Richard Martin, Grant Parker

Graduate Student:

Sienna Kang
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Seminar on the Enlightenment and Revolution, 1660-1830

This workshop excavates the long eighteenth century, the period of western European and American history from 1660 through 1830. Enlightenment and Revolution broadly describe the transformations in science, politics, philosophy, economic thought, art, and literature that account for the coherence of this historical period. In 2014-15 we adopt a broad thematic rubric, “Performance and Belief,” inviting scholars from different fields to examine the period from a conceptual rather than a disciplinary perspective.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Keith Baker, John Bender

Graduate Student:

Claude Willan
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

The Bestial and the Beastly: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human-Animal Relationships

In recent years, Animal Studies has emerged as a central focus in the humanities and social sciences. This workshop encourages interdisciplinary conversations among researchers and advanced students in fields such as anthropology, philosophy, art history, history, and biology. Topics of interest include the social roles of animals, ideas about nature and culture, identity and heritage, power and inequality, and new scientific and humanistic methods to advance such research.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Krish Seetah

Graduate Student:

Tricia Owlett
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

The Material Imagination: Sound, Space, and Human Consciousness

This workshop takes sound as a starting point to ask new questions about history, art, architecture, religion, and society. This workshop explores how sound that is musical or natural can create a sensuous space. From the medieval period to the modern era and the future, and from the corporeal to the technological, this workshop will encourage innovative scholarship across disciplinary boundaries including art history, architecture, music, anthropology, English, history, classics, and religious studies. For more info, please see the workshop's website.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Bissera Pentcheva

Graduate Student:

Frances Molyneux
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Theoretical Perspectives of the Middle Ages

This workshop invites an interdisciplinary community of scholars to examine representations and theories of the medieval past. Workshop questions include: How do we theorize the Middle Ages? How do we develop these theoretical perspectives themselves from literature, history, and art while engaging with modern adaptations of medieval texts, polemical medievalisms, and current debates in the field of humanities at large?

Coodinators

Faculty:

Marisa Galvez

Graduate Student:

Luis Alfonso Rodriguez-Rincon
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Marta Sutton Weeks Research Workshop

Varieties of Agency

Action is fundamental; we relate to the world and each other. Yet how is it to be understood? How do agents relate to their actions, explaining them, giving reasons for them? And how do they relate to each other, act together? This workshop assembles philosophers, linguists, classicists, and literature scholars to work on topics related to these many varieties of agency, including conceptions of action, the self and agential self-knowledge, and shared agency.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Michael Bratman, Tamar Schapiro

Graduate Student:

Nathan Hauthaler
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.

Workshop in Poetics

The Workshop in Poetics is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. Within the eclectic critical landscape called "poetics,” the workshop offers a forum in which scholars with distinctive methods and historical concerns can test their claims and assumptions about poetic objects against the broad linguistic and historical knowledge of the workshop’s members.

Coodinators

Faculty:

Roland Greene, Nicholas Jenkins

Graduate Student:

Julia Noble
Meeting Schedule: (click to expand)

  • No meetings assigned to this workshop yet.