Comparing Literatures: Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, Urdu

updated

Comparative Literature has spent the last few decades expanding its focus beyond Europe and the Anglophone Americas. But has it succeeded? Departments around the world include scholars working on Hebrew, Persian, Arabic, and to a lesser extent Turkish, Urdu, and other non-European languages. But the desire for coverage remains a chimera, always tempting with the prospect of inclusion: "if only we had somebody who did…" What would success, even if we subscribed to such teleology, look like?

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Reflections from Trans;form
Intervention
How do we speak and write in a way that is concise and accessible to a wider audience and that can make an impact on social movements and on life in society?
Interference
By
Emily Apter
Book Chapter
The Untranslatable refers to how concepts assimilate actually existing ways of speaking and being and how ways of speaking and being interfere with concepts. 
Celebrating Mediation: The Poet as Translator
By
Chana Kronfeld
Book Chapter
Amichai’s poetry articulates an implicit theory of translation as the intertextual practice of a historical agent, an implicit theory that is poised to provide a new perspective on the critical discourse of contemporary translation studies.
Between Karachi and California: Is Rigor Enough? (1 of 6)
New
Intervention

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a humanities scholar will, at some point in their career, be tasked with explaining not only why the humanities merit study, but also how to save them from underfunded obsolescence. This discipline-specific responsibility is both blessing and curse: though...

Pedagogy or Catastrophe (2 of 6)
New
Intervention

When things fall apart, when societal deterioration accompanies imperial collapse, we become disillusioned, disenchanted, and this emerges in our literature, art, and philosophy. But how might this disillusionment extend to our pedagogy?

Right now, we are living through catastrophic times, and...

Great Books and Global Brutalities (3 of 6)
New
Intervention

“How do we teach the humanities all over the world?” has been the explicit question at the heart of all the workshops that the Humanities Core has hosted this year. This time, in the third workshop held online on January 25, 2022, the discussion foregrounded a previously implicit question: not only...

A History of the Humanities at Stanford (5 of 6)
New
Intervention

As readers of the previous reports on the HumCore workshop series will have noted, the first quarter of discussions started with a bang. We discussed questions relating to the global humanities at an international, national, and disciplinary scale. In the second quarter, with some of the major large...

The Multiple Simultaneous Temporalities of Global Modernity: Pamuk, Tanpınar, Proust
Forthcoming
By
Shaj Mathew
Journal Article

I am scattered in times whose order I do not understand. —Augustine, Confessions

What my eyes beheld was simultaneous, but what I shall now write down will be successive, because language is successive. —Jorge Luis Borges, “The Aleph”

Only through time time is conquered. —T. S. Eliot, Four...

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