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Robert Huw Morgan, organ, and Elaine Thornburgh, harpsichord: New Instrument Showcase

Department of Music faculty Robert Huw Morgan, organ, and Elaine Thornburgh, harpsichord, perform on Bing Concert Hall's newly-acquired instruments. The makers of these instruments will also be present to provide their unique perspectives on recreating historical designs.
The Hupalo & Repasky Continuo Pipe organ was inspired by 17th-century English and German Chamber organs. The six stop (sets of pipes) divide treble and bass for additional flexibility on a one-keyboard instrument that can play at either 415 pitch (used by many Baroque instruments) or 440 pitch by shifting the key action one half step. There are two unison pitched sets of pipes, two sets pitched an octave higher, one set pitched two octaves higher, and a solo stop of two sets of pipes, one pitched two octaves and a fifth higher, and one pitched three octaves and a third higher. There are three wooden sets of pipes and four metal sets of pipes. The display pipes, from the 4' Principal stop, are high tin content. The case work and pipe shade carvings are of koa, koa veneered wood, and iroko wood.
The John Phillips harpsichord made for the Bing Concert Hall in 2013 is based on a Parisian instrument by Nicolas Dumont in 1707. Nicholas Dumont was an important Parisian harpsichord maker; his instruments occasionally appear in 18th century inventories. In addition to the 1707 instrument, three other Dumont harpsichords are also known to survive. The musical qualities of this early 18th century Parisian harpsichord make it perfect for the contemporary French “Classical” repertoire of François Couperin, Louis Marchand, and the young Jean-Philippe Rameau. There is a certain clarity to the sound in all registers and the extra richness found in later 18th century Parisian instruments, which makes it suitable for a wide variety of solo repertoire as well as for accompaniment.

Details

When:

Sunday, October 23, 2016. 02:30 PM

Where:

Bing Concert Hall

Sponsor:

Department of Music
wkeats@stanford.edu

Admission:

Free | Free tickets available at the Bing Box Office one hour before curtain.