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Against Unchilding: Staging Solidarities Across Borders

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 14, 2022. 04:30 PM - 06:00 PM
Meeting Location: 
Zoom
Workshop: 
Arts + Justice
Meeting Description: 

Featuring Jen Marlowe, Siwar Hasan Aslih, Suhaila Meera, and the cast of Pali/Altaf, as moderated by Vaughn Rasberry.

“Unchilding,” for Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, “is the authorized eviction of children from childhood." Representations of colonial violence, police brutality, occupation, and border politics often occlude the figure of the child. Against the process of unchilding, this conversation brings together artists-scholars Jen Marlowe, Siwar Hasan Aslih, and Suhaila Meera to respond otherwise. Marlow​e’s There is a Field, a response to the murder of ​Palestinian ​17-year-old Asel Asaleh by Israeli police, and Meera’s Pali, a play set in the wake of South Asia's 1947 Partition, set the scene for a dialogue on process, method, and the potential for theatre to serve as a vehicle toward solidarity. Those who RSVP will received a limited-access link to view There is a Field in advance of this talk.

This event will be held via Zoom. RSVP to receive Zoom link >>


SPEAKERS

Jen Marlowe is an award-winning author, filmmaker, and journalist. Her most recent documentary film (There Is A Field) addresses Black-Palestinan solidarity and is based on her play of the same name, about the murder of a Palestinian boy by Israeli police. Jen’s other films include Remembering the Gaza War, Witness Bahrain, One Family in Gaza, Rebuilding Hope, and Darfur Diaries: Message from Home. Her most recent book is I Am Troy Davis, written with innocent Georgia death row prisoner Troy Davis, who was executed in 2011. Her previous books include The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian’s Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker (awarded Middle East Monitor’s Palestine Book Award) and Darfur Diaries: Stories of Survival. Jen’s writing is in The Nation, The ProgressiveTomdispatch.com, Al Jazeera America, and Yes! Magazine. She received travel grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and The Nation Institute Investigative Fund and the Lannan Foundation’s 2019 Cultural Freedom Fellowship. More information: www.donkeysaddle.org.

Siwar Hasan Aslih is a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University, studying social movements, emotions, intergroup relations, and intergroup conflicts. She has been awarded the Marie Sklodowska-Curie postdoctoral fellowship by the EU, and the 2020 Student Publication Award. She obtained her PhD in social psychology from the University of Groningen, in partnership with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her doctoral research examined why and when historically disadvantaged groups collaborate with advantaged group members to promote social change. Her research is inspired and motivated by her lived experiences of oppression. As a Palestinian who was born into a reality of ongoing violence and trauma, she developed an interest in intergroup relations, how groups and individuals construe injustice, and when and why they might be willing, or not, to act against it. The overarching aim of her research is to understand the social and psychological factors that contribute to social change toward equality, justice, and liberation. More information: siwaraslih.com

Suhaila Meera is a PhD candidate in Stanford University’s Department of Theater and Performance Studies (TAPS), also pursuing PhD minors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Her dissertation, “Playing Children: Statelessness and the Performance of Childhood,” examines contemporary theatrical and cinematic representations of children crossing borders, with an emphasis on South Asia and the Middle East. She is currently directing TAPS' winter mainstage production, an adaptation of Bhisham Sahni’s Pali, and dramaturging Yilong Liu’s PrEP Play/or Blue Parachute at the New Conservatory Theatre Center. Before graduate school, Suhaila worked in operations and development at Teamwork Arts, Girls Write Now, and The Juilliard School. She holds a BA in History and Film from Cornell University and has studied acting with Barry John in Bombay and at the Stella Adler Studio in New York.
 

MODERATOR
Vaughn Rasberry is associate professor of English at Stanford University, where he teaches African American and African Diaspora literature. He is the author of Race and the Totalitarian Century: Geopolitics in the Black Literary Imagination (Harvard UP, 2016). Presently, he serves as the interim faculty director of the program in African and African American Studies and as the academic director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.  
 

Sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center | Co-sponsored by the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, the Stanford Arts Institute, and the Department of Theater and Performance Studies, with support from Stanford Live.

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