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Building and Dwelling on the Frontier: Examining Residential Architecture, Household Space and Daily Life in the Ordos Region, Northern China

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 13, 2017. 05:00 PM - 06:30 PM
Meeting Location: 
Stanford Archaeology Center; Building 500, Room 106
Workshop: 
Archaeological Histories and Futures
Meeting Description: 

This talk considers the importance of frontier studies in household archaeology and discusses the applicability of some of these concepts for a better understanding of human relationships in Chinese frontier zones. To illustrate this point, I will use a case study of the Ordos Region, with a primary focus on the middle to late Neolithic transition (3000-1800 B.C) when this region emerged as a frontier zone of the Central Plains. I will focus upon this transition by understanding variations and similarities in residential architecture, use of space, foodways, and practices of daily life within this region.

Tricia Owlett is a Ph.D. Candidate at Stanford studying Chinese Archaeology.  She has obtained a MA (2012) from Yale University, Department of Archaeology, along with a BFA from NYU (2010) in art and anthropology. Her research interests are focused upon the Archaeology of Early China, particularly upon the emergence and development of early complex societies in the Northern Zone of late Neolithic and early Bronze Age China (3000-1500 B.C). As an anthropological archaeologist, she explores the relationship between early agro-pastoralism, urban development, and household economy and space. She is currently co-editing a volume with Li Liu and Anne Underhill on the development of early urbanism within China for the journal Archaeological Research in Asia.

 

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