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Conceptualizing Justice Across Academic Disciplines

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 24, 2020. 04:30 PM - 06:00 PM
Meeting Location: 
Zoom
Workshop: 
Arts and Justice
Meeting Description: 

This year, the Stanford Humanities Center will support a Geballe Workshop Series on “Arts + Justice.” Led by Professor Jisha Menon and the collective energy of graduate students, we hope to engage with scholars and artists on the implications of justice (in all of its range of meanings), including the cultural terrain of law, aesthetics of resistance, practices of restorative justice, and the position of art within these debates.

For this opening session, Al-Saber, Annamma, and Sewer will reflecton how justice is taken up in their practice as educators, activists, and artists.

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About the Panelists
 

Samer Al-Saber is Assistant Professor of Theatre And Performance Studies, and a member of the faculty at the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies. Before coming to Stanford, he has taught at various institutions (Davidson College, Florida State University) on a wide range of topics, including Conflict and Theatre, Arab Theatre and Culture, Palestinian Theatre, Performing Arabs, Staging Islam and American Politics, and Orientalism. At Stanford, he teaches courses concerned with identity, race, and ethnicity at the intersection of Islam and the Arts His international research is focused on the cultural dimensions of the Arab World, the Middle East, and Islamicate regions. As artist/scholar, his field work intersects with theatre practice as a director and writer.

Prior to her doctoral studies, Subini Ancy Annamma was a special education teacher in both public schools and youth prisons. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research critically examines the mutually constitutive nature of racism and ableism, how they interlock with other marginalizing oppressions, and how these intersections impact youth education trajectories in urban schools and youth prisons. Further, she positions students as knowledge generators, exploring how their narratives can inform teacher and special education. Dr. Annamma’s book, The Pedagogy of Pathologization (Routledge, 2018) focuses on the education trajectories of incarcerated disabled girls of color. She is also a Ford Postdoctoral Fellow for the 2018-19 school year hosted at UCLA.

Hadiya Sewer is a Research Fellow in the African and African American Studies Program at Stanford University. Sewer earned their Ph.D. in Africana Studies at Brown University. As an Africana philosopher, Sewer’s research and advocacy focus on political theory, feminist theories, and environmental justice discourses in the Caribbean. This scholarship uses the United States Virgin Islands, a predominantly Black unincorporated American territory, as a case study to trace the conceptions of freedom and the human that exist in this part of the dependent Caribbean. They are currently working on a monograph titled, “(De)Colonial Desires: Race, Power, and Philosophies of Freedom in the U.S. Virgin Islands.” Their research, teaching, and advocacy provide phenomenological examinations of anti-blackness, colonialism, imperialism, and the climate crisis. As a community engaged scholar, Sewer is also the President and Co-Founder of St.JanCo: the St. John Heritage Collective, a land rights and cultural heritage preservation nonprofit in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.
 

Sponsored by Geballe Workshop Series with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Stanford Arts Institute

Workshops Calendar

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