The Classics Which Is (Not) Ours

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We have framed this collection of writing about ancient Greek and Roman literature around the contrary idea of the "Greece which is (not) ours" in an attempt to capture the dynamic and creative tensions that arise when doing classical scholarship in full awareness of the different ways in which successive generations of readers and scholars have constructed ancient Greece and Rome in their own image.

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The Doubleness of Dido
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By
David Quint
Book Chapter
 Aeneas and the Aeneid transform the tale of Dido, the Punic city’s own national myth. At the same time, Virgil’s rewriting criticizes that myth on its own terms.
The Death of a Discipline
New
By
Dan-el Padilla Peralta
Essay
 It is well past time for this contemporary configuration of Classics to die, so that it might be born into a new life. 
Did the Greeks Believe in Their Robots?
New
By
Martin Devecka
Journal Article
A certain kind of technological innovation (or better, development) was going on all through antiquity, but there were limits to this development.
The Republic as a Metic Space
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By
Demetra Kasimis
Book Chapter
In Plato's presentation of Athenian democracy in a metic frame, Athenian membership re-emerges as a question, not a given, for political life.
Classics and the Victorians
New
By
Gideon Nisbet
Book Chapter
The Victorians have been ridiculed for romantically construing ancient Greece as the sunny childhood of humanity, but doing so made sense to them.

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