Poetry after Language

The diverse practices associated with the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E school of poetry marked a shift—or a return to avant-garde practices and leftist politics—in American poetry in the 1970s. 

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Michelle Jia. Image via Flickr.

Introduction
By Invitation
By
Gillian White
Book Chapter
Bringing a provocative perspective to the poetry wars that have divided practitioners and critics for decades, Gillian White argues that the sharp disagreements surrounding contemporary poetics have been shaped by “lyric shame”—an unspoken but pervasive embarrassment over what poetry is, should be, and fails to be.
These People Live Here: Conceptualism and the New Documentary Poetics
By Invitation
By
Matthew Whitley
Essay
A maximalist take on a now commonplace idea that demands the equally commonplace response, “what relationship exists between the texts and the writer?”  And the more immediate question, “who, then, do the texts serve?”  The answer to these questions is at the core of the struggle to develop a documentary poetics adequate to our new and increasingly textual world. 
Pavel Arseniev: Poetry and Prose
By Invitation
By
Pavel Arseniev
translated by the Cement Collective
Essay
A selection of poetry and prose by Pavel Arseniev, including "The Pragmatic Paradox as a Means of Innovation in Contemporary Poetic Speech."
Undermining the Instrumental Discourse of Reification: Alternate Linguistic Discourses in Language Poetry
By Invitation
By
Albena Lutzkanova-Vassileva
Book Chapter
As they share the belief that it is referential language that, in its predictable and transparent patterns, causes death of the mind and rebroadcasts, on the level of writing, the rules of commodity fetishism, Language poets set out to create an alternative linguistic discourse that aims to undermine the instrumental use of language.
Roman Osminkin: Poetry and Prose
By Invitation
By
Roman Osminkin
translated by the Cement Collective
Essay
This selection of work by the Saint Petersburg experimental writer and artist Roman Osminkin includes A Journey from St. Petersburg to Moscow, poems, and critical writings. 
Preface to Poetic Force
By
Kevin McLaughlin
Book Chapter
McLaughlin examines the relationship between poetry and philosophy in light of Immanuel Kant's theory of force.
Introduction
By
Caroline Levine
Book Chapter
Forms offers a powerful new answer to one of the most pressing problems facing literary, critical, and cultural studies today—how to connect form to political, social, and historical context.
Poetry and Sociality in a Global Frame
Peer Review
By
Walt Hunter
Journal Article
Khaled Furani’s Silencing the Sea (2012) and Michael Dowdy’s  Broken Souths (2013) bring a global perspective to post-1945 and contemporary traditions of Palestinian and Latina/o poetry.
Aesthetics Contra “Identity” in Contemporary Poetry Studies
Peer Review
By
Dorothy J. Wang
Book Chapter
I do not at all see why we must make an either-or choice between reading Beckett or reading Aimé Césaire, between calling out and into question “cultural desires, drives, anxieties, or prejudices” or analyzing metonymy, chiasmus, sprung rhythm, lineation, anaphora, parataxis, trochees, and so forth.
Blackness and Poetry
By
Fred Moten
Journal Article
Given how the category of the human has been put under the severest pressure by the terrors of colonialism and imperialism, black thought, which is to say black social life, remains a fruitful site for inhabiting and soliciting the human differential within the general ecology.
The Animal Model of Inescapable Shock
By
Anne Boyer
Essay
This prose poem explores the human as animal. "If an animal has previously suffered escapable shock, and then she suffers inescapable shock, she will be happier than if she has previously not suffered escapable shock — for if she hasn’t, she will only know about being shocked inescapably."
In Imploded Sentences: On Charles Bernstein's Poetic Attentions
By
Enikö Bollobás
Essay
I would like to make the following general claims about the poetry of Charles Bernstein, the 2015 Janus Pannonius Grand Prize for Poetry Laureate. Bernstein’s is a poetry of attention, a poetry attentive to language, a language poetry. His is innovative-experimental poetry, which at the same time takes on some radical poetic and philosophical traditions. Moreover, Bernstein likes to cross boundaries, inviting his readers especially in his philosophical poems to participate in the creative process he calls “wreading.”
Charles Bernstein: "Of Time and the Line"
By
Ian Probstein
Essay
Charles Bernstein’s main weapon is language — sharp as a sword and piercing as a spear. Yet, he seems both rely on his weapon and distrust it trying to reach beyond it.

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