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The Psychology of Democracy

Revolutions in Russia (1917), China (1949), Iran (1979), Egypt (2011), and a number of other societies have failed to bring about democracy. At the same time, democracy in the United States and other industrialized societies remains seriously flawed. The Psychology of Democracy (Moghaddam, 2016) explored some psychological processes that influence the speed and extent of collective and individual level changes toward 'actualized' democracy.
Dr. Fathali M. Moghaddam is a professor of Psychology and the Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science at Georgetown University. He is the Editor-in-Chief of “Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace and Psychology.” His most recent books include Questioning Causality (with Rom Harre, 2016), The Psychology of Friendship and Enmity (2013, 2 vols. with Rom Harre), and The Psychology of Dictatorship (2013).
Lecture is part of the series Science and Society: Frontiers of the Mind. A joint project with the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology at Stanford University Medical School.

Details

When:

Thursday, September 29, 2016. 06:30 PM

Where:

Pigott Hall, Building 260, Room 113

Sponsor:

Iranian Studies Program and the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology at Stanford University Medical School

Contact:

650-497-3931
iranianstudies@stanford.edu

Admission:

Lecture is Free and Open to the Public (no tickets or RSVP required).
Lecture is in English.